Japanese Cuisines

It's not all sushi - find out about some of Japan's other favorite foods, and even learn how to read the menu in your local tempura shop.

We've got plenty of recipes, and our articles on the Japanese kitchen will provide insight into the role of food in everyday Japanese life.

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Food markets, knife shops, and odd culinary destinations
Jonelle Patrick learns the secrets of making fake plastic tempura
Japanese cooking show hosted by a poodle
A very entertaining short video
Photos by Jocelyn Simard

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Featured Recipes
Japanese Recipe Index
Decorative Food Carving
Salmon mousse and sole wrapped in zucchini "fish net," zucchini boat and zucchini rolls
Stuffed eggplant using "Fish Trap" technique, and Eggplant Chrysanthemum in Japanese wine sauce
Grilled sea bream with Japanese fan design, Leaf Boat Canape, and Switchback Cut
The Japanese Kitchen
From strainers and graters to bamboo baskets - an introduction to the everyday tools used in Japanese cooking
Practical and beautiful - a look at hand-made graters from Japanese craftsmen. From the book Cool Tools: Cooking Utensils from the Japanese Kitchen, by Kate Klipensteen.
Whether it's fine pottery or a humble cedar box, sake cups and flasks are an important part of the sake-drinking experience. From The Book of Sake by Philip Harper
Simple but elegant - cypress-wood tubs for steamed rice and makisu mats for making sushi rolls. From the book Cool Tools: Cooking Utensils from the Japanese Kitchen, by Kate Klipensteen.
Home cooking in Japan
Articles by Elizabeth Andoh
Remembering family culinary traditions
The fine art of rice-bran pickling
An inside look at the Japanese kitchen
Sweet bean-paste buns and the cartoon character they inspired
"Moon-viewing broth" and the poetry of menu-writing
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Article Search

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Specialty Restaurant Foods and Menus
Articles and sample menus from "What's What in Japanese Restaurants"
A hearty wintertime specialty prepared from fish, seafood, chicken, meat and/or vegetables in a bubbling cauldron right at your table.
Good unagi combines a rich flavor (a bit like pate) with an appetizing texture, crisp on the outside but tender on the inside.
Skewers of succulent chicken dipped in barbecue sauce, grilled to perfection over hot charcoals, then washed down with cold beer -- it's easy to see the appeal of yakitori after a hard day's work
All the essential qualities of Japanese cuisine are reflected in preparing tempura: the use of absolutely fresh ingredients, the artful presentation, and the perfection of technique by a skilled chef.
"Okonomiyaki" literally means "cook what you like," and customers get to choose their own favorite ingredients and then cook up their pancakes right at the table.
Oden is a very simple stew made by simmering fish dumplings, fried tofu, eggs, and vegetables in a kelp-based stock for several hours.
Okinawan cooking tends toward stronger and spicier flavors than Japanese food, and is more heavily influenced by Chinese cooking styles.

Culinary Culture
From endless tofu variations and gorgeous vegetables to elegant kaiseki service and shojin-ryori (vegetarian temple cuisine), Kyoto has a unique culinary tradition.
Is it matcha or bancha? Learn all about the different varieties and grades of green tea in Japan.
Sake expert Philip Harper discusses the best foods to nibble on while you're drinking sake
What kind of sake goes best with cheese, game meats and foie gras?
Dried sardines and herring roe, fish-paste cakes and black beans - it must be time for osechi-ryori.
Looking for the perfect crunch - all about sembei and how they're made

Reference
including a Japanese fish/seafood glossary and helpful restaurant phrases
Learn how to decipher the Japanese labels on a bottle of sake.
A book that introduces Japanese specialty cuisines
Japanese foods in history
Excerpted from The Cambridge World History of Food
How sushi developed historically
Shiitake, enoki and matsutake
An explanation of the different varieties
All about "edible sea vegetables"
Tea leaf grades and types
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