Numazuko
Ginza: Sushi
Numazuko (Ginza: Sushi)
Numazuko
Open 11am-10pm (LO) daily.
Sun: Open Sundays
no smoking: No smoking

This upscale conveyor-belt sushi shop serves good-quality fish along with craft sake from smaller breweries around Japan. You can choose from at least four or five sake by the glass (starting at around Y700) and several more by the bottle. Of course you may be able to find more extensive sake lists at any number of regular sushi counters, but somehow the combination of premium sake and the relaxed atmosphere of a conveyor-belt sushiya is especially appealing.

Most standard sushi items range from Y170-520 per plate, plus there are a number of daily specials like deep-fried kawaebi (river shrimp) and tuna-cheek steak. We enjoyed a rather creative "kani-moriawase" - nigiri-zushi with big, meaty crab legs topped by freshly shredded crabmeat and a dab of kani-miso (Y1280 for two pieces). Other highlights included plump pieces of grilled anago eel and freshly blowtorch-seared flounder fin, while the marinated eggplant provided a nice change of pace.

In addition to sake and beer there are a half-dozen Japanese wines, but these are sold by the bottle only. As with any converyor-belt shop, it's best to order directly from the chef when you can, and although they have an all-you-can-eat plan we'd recommend ordering a la carte. There are booths as well as counter seating, convenient for groups of four to six people.

After two rounds of sake and quite a bit of good sushi, the bill came to around Y4500 per person - not that much cheaper than our local neighborhood sushi counter, but quite a bit more informal and relaxed, and good value overall. Lunch specials start at Y1500 for a 12-piece plate, and take-out is available all day long. English is spoken and English menus are available.




Ginza
Chuo-ku, Ginza 1-8-19, Kirarito Ginza 8F.
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Venue listing from Bento.com4 Star Rating: recommended